darrienlindsey

Darrien Lindsey Lindsey itibaren Sorkh Dasht, Mazandaran, Iran itibaren Sorkh Dasht, Mazandaran, Iran

Okuyucu Darrien Lindsey Lindsey itibaren Sorkh Dasht, Mazandaran, Iran

Darrien Lindsey Lindsey itibaren Sorkh Dasht, Mazandaran, Iran

darrienlindsey

Poor Rebus who should have retired years before...wait he did...is back on the job, as a fake bad cop to slush out the real bad cops who are guilty of robbery, murder and mayhem. Rebus manages to survive in the end thankfully, as cynically as ever. I hope he stays on the job. Edinburgh would be so much duller without him. And, of course, the Fringe.

darrienlindsey

Katyana's review pretty well sums it up. I liked the book, it seems when there is a mystery in the book it is more interesting to me than the typical boy and girl hate each other and then get together at the end of the book type theme. It IS a Paranormal. Those of you that do not like that will not like this. If you like The Sixth Sense, I see ghost... you will probably like this one just fine!

darrienlindsey

One thing I've discovered is that people tend to have different favorites of Vonnegut's work. Many prefer Slaughter House Five, some love Breakfast of Champions, and my sister's favorite is Galapagos. The only person I've ever met whose favorite Vonnegut book is Bluebeard is... me. So it goes. The book follows former abstract expressionist painter Rabo Karabekian, serving as his autobiography and a mystery story simultaneously. The mystery? What is Rabo keeping in the huge potato barn on his large estate. Some of you may remember Mr. Karabekian from Breakfast of Champions; he was largely the same character, albeit younger in years. He's famous for his paintings, you see: he would take huge canvases, spray paint them all one color, and put pieces of colored tape on them. There's several jokes regarding Rabo's paintings, one of which he gave away in Breakfast: his work is Rabo's view of the human soul. When you strip away all of the unnecessary crap that makes us up, we're all basically glowing shafts of light, represented by the pieces of tape. I won't give away the other joke, but it's a good one. Anyway, this book is a lot of things: a reflection on an imaginary life, a faux biography, and a moral we could all probably take to heart. And we do get to find out what Bluebeard keeps in his potato barn. It's a darned big thing.