suzequinlan

Suze Quinlan Quinlan itibaren 1170-002 Lizbon, Portekiz itibaren 1170-002 Lizbon, Portekiz

Okuyucu Suze Quinlan Quinlan itibaren 1170-002 Lizbon, Portekiz

Suze Quinlan Quinlan itibaren 1170-002 Lizbon, Portekiz

suzequinlan

Didnt read it but I saw the movie several times. One of my favorites.

suzequinlan

Gertrude (Trudy) White encounters the typical middle school emotional roller coaster of cliques, boys, and grades. However, unlike most girls her age, Trudy's parents are in their late 60s and early 70s and much older than other parents at school. This seems to have little affect on Trudy until it becomes apparent that something is wrong with Pop: he's more and more forgetful, very sleepy, and he says odd things, sometimes repeatedly. Pop's Alzheimer's disease changes him -- amid all the huge changes that Trudy is already facing. Author Jessica Lee Anderson doesn't show us how it changes Trudy internally, except for mild regret and a commitment to help her mother more. The book's middle-grade format presents a chapter every two to three pages, and it's clear that Anderson's sparse verbiage and fast-paced progression through time are targeted to tween readers. Yet her dialogue and narrative perspectives are often more adult-oriented than that of middle-graders. The book struck an emotional chord with me on an adult level and because of my own losses. A tween reader will relate to Trudy and gain insights to the White family's experience with Alzheimer's disease, but perhaps without the emotionally engagement of an older reader. Notably, Anderson brings a sense of hope to the conclusion of the story and, given the devastation Alzheimer's disease causes, this is a mighty accomplishment.

suzequinlan

Well, that was frustrating on so many levels. Yes, this is a graphic novel touchstone, the one to look to for portrayal of complex issues and existential angst, the one to look to for the nature of the heroic and the ordinary. But for pity's sake! Alan Moore betrays virtually every major character's character, doesn't know what to do with Dr. Manhattan, and delivers one of the most impotent resolutions I've ever read. The only reason to like this book is to see how it fits into the history of graphic novels, and to absorb the at-times extraordinary artwork.

suzequinlan

If you are an animal lover, I recommend you avoid this book. I found it too painful to read about the animal experiments and had to skim many parts of the book. Truthfully, I found the author's portrayal of the social world more interesting than the scientific anyway.