renatofreiab96

Renato Costa Costa itibaren Barabai, Central Hulu Sungai Regency, South Kalimantan, Endonezya itibaren Barabai, Central Hulu Sungai Regency, South Kalimantan, Endonezya

Okuyucu Renato Costa Costa itibaren Barabai, Central Hulu Sungai Regency, South Kalimantan, Endonezya

Renato Costa Costa itibaren Barabai, Central Hulu Sungai Regency, South Kalimantan, Endonezya

renatofreiab96

Gen X yazarlarının bu kadar asıldığı grunge kurgu bir süre sonra biraz bayatladı. Ancak, Avustralya grunge kurgusunun seminal bir parçası olsaydı, bu benim seçimim olurdu. Bu kitap, crummy share konut, aşırı fıçı şarap ve pul pul ilişkileri yaşayan bir kişi için birkaç sinir vurmak gerekir. Benim için, 'Elinde bir Falafel ile Öldü' ve aynı derecede iyi olan karanlık meslektaşı.

renatofreiab96

This book was BORING, to sum it up in a few words.

renatofreiab96

I absolutely fell in love with this book. The author did such an amazing job with a different plot. When I first started reading this book, I thought “how corny is this going to be”? I mean love actually being removed from people, a criminal offence etc… However, the deeper I got the more enthralled I was with the story. The characters are realistic, loveable and easy to associate with. The relationship between the two main characters; Lena and Alex, is truly interesting. A successful portrait of first love and its emotions. From the sweaty palms to the stomach butterflies, the author managed to capture it all. By the end of the book, you can actually feel the emotion and I for one find the intensity a rarity with many of the novels of today. This first installment surpassed my expectations, from the vivid details to the characters and their interactions. There was action, romance, drama and weirdness all wrapped into one. I would highly recommend this book, as well as this series to anyone.

renatofreiab96

Once, on a bus in Tanzania, I got into a fight about the movie "Crash". The fight was pretty silly, but I still got upset enough to cry about it. The argument was an impassioned debate between me and two of the other kids I was studying abroad with. They thought it was a brilliant important commentary on race and class in America. I thought it was a didactic, simplified, contrived piece of shit. Drown is lthe opposite of a movie like Crash. Sure, it covers race and class and the failed pursuit of the American dream, and even does so in a way that's straightforward. And yet, Diaz manages to be quite nuanced throughout-- he's never trying to "teach" you a lesson about race, and never hits you over the head with his immigrant story. He's not telling a parable, or preaching, or posturing. Diaz is brilliant because his writing is refreshingly real, yet incredibly poetic. Without trying too hard. Somehow, it hit me, halfway through the book: this is exactly the opposite of Crash! Drown accomplishes so effortlessly what Crash tried painfully hard to: to tell a real story, about real people doing real things. Maybe it's because of that Terrence baby wipes guy. I haven't read Oscar Wao yet. However, I certainly plan to.